In these pages, the Jonathan and Jeannette Rosen Ancient Near Eastern Seminar in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Cornell University together with the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI), an international research project based at the University of California, Los Angeles, present a database of the 6557 inscribed objects in the CUNES collection. The cuneiform tablets included here were digitized and much of the metadata was entered by a team of researchers supervised by David I. Owen curator of tablets collections, Cornell University, that included Dr. Nicole Brisch (former Rosen Foundation post-doc, Faculty Associate), Lisa M. Kinney-Bajwa (former Rosen Foundation Conservator and Photographer), Laura Johnson-Kelley (current Rosen Foundation Conservator and Photographer), Dr. Alhena Gadotti (former Rosen Foundation post-doc, Faculty Associate), Dr. Lance Allred (former Rosen Foundation post-doc, Faculty Associate) and Dr. Alexandra Kleinerman (current Rosen Foundation post-doc, Faculty Associate). A substantial number of these tablets are now published in the series Cornell University Studies in Assyriology and Sumerology (CUSAS 1 [2007], 3 [2007], 4 [2008], 5 [2009]).

Introduction to the collection
Cornell Cuneiform Library
CUNES homepage
Copyright & Permissions
CDLI

 


Tablets by period:

   Uruk Period (ca. 3350-3000 BC)
   Early Dynastic (ca. 2600-2350 BC)
   Old Akkadian (ca. 2350-2200 BC)
   Ur III period (ca. 2100-2000 BC)
   Old Babylonian (ca. 2000-1600 BC)
   Middle Babylonian (ca. 1500-1000 BC)
   Neo-Babylonian (ca. 1000-540 BC)
   Uncertain date

Tablets by text genre:

   Administrative texts
   Literary texts
   Legal texts
   Letters
   Lexical texts
   Royal/Monumental texts
   Uncertain

Search all CDLI inscriptions



The tablet to the right (CUNES 50-11-050 = S. Monaco, CUSAS 1, 98) contains an Uruk III period (ca. 3200 BC) account from southern Mesopotamia (click image to be directed to the text’s corresponding CDLI page).








A cooperative effort of the Department of Near Eastern Studies,
Cornell University
and the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative