CDLI Newsletter 2021/1: January 2021

Contributions
As always, we are grateful for ATF contributions from colleagues; since June, we have received new texts and corrections from or credited to: Cavigneaux, Cheffings, Cripps, Dahl, Dercksen, Firth, Foxvog, Gomi, Guidi, Horowitz, Jagersma, Johnson, Lafont, Liu, Ozaki, Pagé-Perron, Reid, Stol, Szlechter, Wagensonner, Wasserman, and Woestenburg. We would like to highlight the contributions of Thoru Ozaki, who continues to send large numbers of important corrections to transliterations of texts from across the 3rd Millennium BC; CDLI is dependent on feedback, contributions and corrections from users and we are grateful for all of these.

Publications
Since June, two Bulletin articles were published, you can consult them here: https://cdli.ucla.edu/?q=publications/bulletin

Saber Amiri Parian (2020:01) "A New Edition of the Elamite Version of the Behistun Inscription (II)"
J. Caleb Howard (2020:02) "Cuneiform Tablets in Collections at the University of Kansas"

Two CDL Preprints were also published:
https://cdli.ucla.edu/?q=cuneiform-digital-library-preprints
CDLP 19.0 Karlsson, Mattias - Assyrian Royal Titulary in Babylonia
CDLP 20.0 Karlsson, Mattias - The Depictions of the “Other” on the Balawat Gates

Many colleagues have expressed their interest in collaborating on a memorial volume for Bob Englund. We invite colleagues that would like to honor Bob's memory to instead consider submitting an article to the CDLJ or CDLB, mentioning in the article they are doing so in his memory since Bob founded the journals with the objectives of opening access to scientific publications in the field and to enhance access to digital resources.

New collaborations
We are very pleased to announce the restart of a collaboration to digitise the Liagre Böhl collection of the University of Leiden, following fruitful discussions with both the previous and current directors of NINO, Caroline Waerzeggers and Willemijn Waal. Obviously, the pandemic means that no work digitising the objects of the collection can currently take place, but we aim to place the complete catalog of the collection online later this year.

Through its partner institution the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin, the CDLI has recently concluded a MoU with the Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz, setting out the framework for a renewed effort to digitise the cuneiform collections of Berlin’s Vorderasiatisches Museum. The collections of the VAM were among the first to be digitised for the CDLI, and the 4th and 3rd millennium cuneiform collections of the VAM remains among the core files of the project. We look forward to updating our existing records, and to collaborate with VAM staff in making the entire collection of the VAM accessible through the CDLI in the years to come.

We are also happy to announce that images of a majority of the cuneiform tablets in the collection of Utah Museum of Natural History of the University of Utah, in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, is now available on CDLI, thanks to a successful collaboration between CDLI staff and Michelle Knoll, former Assistant Curator and NAGPRA Manager at the Utah Museum of Natural History. A majority of the collection was published by David Owen in 1997 (ASJ 19), a few tablets remain unpublished, but now available on CDLI.

On behalf of the CDLI
Jacob L Dahl, Bertrand Lafont, Émilie Pagé-Perron, Jürgen Renn

Date: 
2021/01/31